Get The Real Facts on Oral Bacteria

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DID YOU KNOW….

  • 8 out of 10 adults in the U.S. have some form of gum disease.
  • People who have a family history of gum disease may be genetically predisposed to the disease.

Dentists Gig HarborResearch has established a link between oral bacteria and other systemic diseases, including:

TYPE 2 DIABETES

Diabetic patients with gum disease have a higher blood sugar level and require more medication to manage their diabetes.

HEART DISEASE, STROKE, HARDENING OF THE ARTERIES (atherosclerosis)

Oral bacteria entering the body may cause inflammation, which (in combination with fat deposits) can lead to plaque buildup, clogged blood flow, and/or blood clots – which can cause heart attacks, strokes and other dangerous health conditions.

RESPIRATORY DISEASE

Biopsies of diseased lung tissue revealed the same bacteria present in the gum disease.

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

Bacteria associated with Alzheimer’s Disease have been isolated in the periodontal pockets and along the nerves from the teeth of the brain tissue. Introduction of these bacteria into brain cultures results in formation of beta amyloid – a cause of Alzheimer’s Disease.

PRE-TERM AND LOW BIRTH WEIGHT BABIES

Pregnant women with gum disease have a 57% incidence of low birth weight babies and a 50% greater incidence of preterm deliveries.

Periodontal Disease is the body’s response to a bacterial infection in your gum tissues. Common symptoms of oral bacterial infections in the gum tissue include:

  • Bleeding gums when brushing or flossing
  • Swollen, red or tender gums
  • Receding gums
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Obvious plaque, tartar or calculus
  • Sensitive teeth
  • Spaces between teeth where there used to not be
  • Loose or mobile teeth

WHAT YOU CAN DO….

1. Visit your dentist and hygienist regularly and follow the recommendations in regards to the type and frequency of cleanings needed.

2. Floss EVERY day; this is the most important thing you can do for your teeth! There is no substitute for flossing.

3. Brush thoroughly two times a day; consider an electric toothbrush.

4. Use a Waterpik.

5. Look into a prescription mouth rinse or Listerine.

6. Eat healthy and reduce the amount of processed foods (think whole foods).

At Kim Rioux, DDS, we are more than happy to help you with a thorough dental check-up to determine if there are any issues at present.  Contact us today to set up your personalized consultation.

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